In chapter two of The Time Machine by H.G. Wells, what is one condition the Time Traveler sets before telling his story?

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When the Time Traveler arrives at his home for dinner with his friends in chapter two, he has obviously been through some sort of an ordeal--he is dirty, injured, his clothes are torn, and he looks exhausted. This directly relates to the answer to your question. The one thing the...

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When the Time Traveler arrives at his home for dinner with his friends in chapter two, he has obviously been through some sort of an ordeal--he is dirty, injured, his clothes are torn, and he looks exhausted. This directly relates to the answer to your question. The one thing the Time Traveler asks of his friends, once he is clean and fed, is that if they want to hear his story, they must not interrupt him. He says he has been time traveling for eight days, is too tired to answer any questions, and that he will only be able to get through all of it if he is allowed to continue without interruptions. The week before he had also asked his guests to start eating without him the next week if he is late, but I think your question refers to his request to be able to tell his story as quickly as possible as he really needs sleep. He needs to tell his story first.

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