Throughout the story, Esperanza clings her desire to leave Mango Street. Do you think that one day she will leave?Throughout the story, Esperanza clings her desire to leave Mango Street. Do you...

Throughout the story, Esperanza clings her desire to leave Mango Street. Do you think that one day she will leave?

Throughout the story, Esperanza clings her desire to leave Mango Street. Do you think that one day she will leave?

Asked on by cferr123

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hilahmarca's profile pic

hilahmarca | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Associate Educator

Posted on

Unlike her peers and siblings, Esperanza has higher ambitions and greater skills that will allow her to break free from the chains of Mango Street and become and independent lady.  Of course, by the end of the book, she realizes it's not enough just to leave, but to come back to help those who come after her.  This shows great maturity in her character going from selfish goals of leaving and turning her back, to wanting to change her neighborhood for the better.  There is no doubt due to her writing talents and her stubborn drive that Esperanza will be able to leave Mango Street.

brettd's profile pic

brettd | High School Teacher | (Level 2) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

I agree that she badly wants to leave, but it's not that simple.  Poverty is interwoven through all of the stories in House on Mango Street, and it has a way of trapping people close to family because it is difficult or impossible to survive on your own, especially in an urban setting.  While she might leave the street and the neighborhood itself, it will be a lot harder for her to break the cycle of poverty.  It is one of things that resonates as particularly true about the stories, and as teachers I see students like Esperanza every day.  It's part of why I wanted to teach in the first place.

teachertaylor's profile pic

teachertaylor | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Senior Educator

Posted on

I agree that she will leave.  Near the end of the novel, Esperanza learns that she has a desire and a gift to write.  I think she will follow this desire as her ticket out of her community.  But as she moves forward, she will do so with the view that there might be others out there who are not as fortunate as she has been.  Even if she doesn't return to Mango Street, there will be other "Mango Streets" in other places, and there she can give back to those people.

amy-lepore's profile pic

amy-lepore | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

Absolutely!  Her personality and desire for better are stronger than her bonds to heritage and family.  She will always come back, but there is no doubt that she will leave.

pmiranda2857's profile pic

pmiranda2857 | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

In The House on Mango Street Esperanza reveals herself as both a product of the community in which she lives and one of the only figures courageous enough to transcend her circumstances. Like all adolescents, Esperanza struggles to forge her own identity.

Despite her ties to the past, Esperanza leaves no doubt that she is destined to leave this neighborhood for a bigger world outside the barrio, an allusion to her dual cultural loyalties. Esperanza believes that one day she will own her own house outside the neighborhood. However, she also leaves no doubt that she will return one day for those unable to leave the environment on their own. In "Bums in the Attic," for example, she describes how she will let bums sleep in the attic of her house one day, "because I know how it is to be without a house." In "The Three Sisters," Esperanza gives further foreshadowing that she will one day leave Mango Street, but will return to help others. "You will always be Mango Street," three ladies tell her. "You can't erase what you know. You can't forget who you are." Esperanza leaves the reader with the notion that she will leave but will not forget her roots. Though she does not always want to belong to this environment, she realizes that her roots are too strong to resist. The books and papers Esperanza takes with her at the end of the book are her means of freedom from the ugly house and the social constraints on the neighborhood.

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