Through which quotes are the environment and setting described in Imre Kertész's novel Fatelessness?

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Quotes that describe the book’s environment and setting could center around Nazi-occupied Europe and the concentration camps.

While most of Fatelessness takes place in the Nazi concentration camps, the beginning and end occur in different settings. One quote that describes Gyuri’s environment before the concentration camp is, “I walked from...

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Quotes that describe the book’s environment and setting could center around Nazi-occupied Europe and the concentration camps.

While most of Fatelessness takes place in the Nazi concentration camps, the beginning and end occur in different settings. One quote that describes Gyuri’s environment before the concentration camp is, “I walked from school to our shop. It was a clear and warm morning, considering that it was early spring.” This quote reveals the season and the convenient, cozy environment as Gyuri can go from school to the lumber store on foot.

In the same paragraph, a quote reveals something about an odious aspect of Gyuri’s environment: “In the light breeze, my coat flaps could be tossed back to hide my yellow star.” The Nazis made Jews wear yellow stars, so the presence of the yellow star indicates the influence Nazis have had on Gyuri’s environment.

On the train and in the camps, the inhumane environment is displayed in countless quotes. For example, a military policeman tells Gyuri and the other Jews on the train, “Die of thirst, then!” The extremely precarious setting is furthered when Gyuri and the others strategize about how to get the most sustenance from the soup served at camp:

We should try to avoid being in front and should stay in the rear, where presumably they would serve us from the bottom of the pot and consequently from the thick of the soup.

After Gyuri survives the camps, a journalist imposes his description of the environment. He asks Gyuri to tell him about “the hell of the camps.” Gyuri rejects the journalist's description. As brutal and cruel as the setting was, Gyuri doesn’t present the environment as absolutely negative. “Life there had been clearer and simpler,” he says.

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