In "Those Winter Sundays" by Sheffey, how does the speaker convey his feelings so powerfully to the reader?

Expert Answers

An illustration of the letter 'A' in a speech bubbles

In "Those Winter Sundays," the poet, Robert Hayden , conveys his meaning to the reader using various devices. For example, he uses auditory images, such as the "the cold splintering, breaking." The auditory details capture the sound of the fire and emphasize the way the fire that the...

Unlock
This Answer Now

Start your 48-hour free trial to unlock this answer and thousands more. Enjoy eNotes ad-free and cancel anytime.

Start your 48-Hour Free Trial

In "Those Winter Sundays," the poet, Robert Hayden, conveys his meaning to the reader using various devices. For example, he uses auditory images, such as the "the cold splintering, breaking." The auditory details capture the sound of the fire and emphasize the way the fire that the father creates warms up the cold house. The author also uses repetition, such as "What did I know, what did I know," in the second-to-last line of the poem, which also emphasizes how little the author understood the ways in which the father sacrificed his comfort for his family. In addition, the author uses word choice, such as "blueblack cold" and "cracked hands." The author creates the new word "blueblack" to refer to that time between darkness and daylight, when it is very cold in winter. The author uses carefully chosen words such as "cracked" to give the reader an image of how hard the father works. 

Approved by eNotes Editorial Team