This question is referring to the crucible    What “law” is Danforth referring to in his assertion: “I should hang ten thousand that dread to rise against the law, and an ocean of...

This question is referring to the crucible

 

 

What “law” is Danforth referring to in his assertion: “I should hang ten thousand that dread to rise against the law, and an ocean of salt tears could not melt the resolutions of the statues”?

Asked on by laurajeanb

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pirateteacher | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Associate Educator

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The "law" Danforth refers to is Salem's Religious law.  Remember, during this time period there was no separation of church and state.  The rules of the state were the same as the rules of the church.  Think back to the beginning of the play in which Miller's exposition tells us that people were charged with walking around the town on Sundays to make sure people were in church.

In the instance of this quote, Danforth believes he is doing God's work by eradicating Salem of the witchcraft threat.  This includes fighting those who are against him, and therefore also against the work of the church.  It also shows that he and the other judges are cruel and refuse to listen to any evidence that goes against the girls’ testimony or the court’s case.

 

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