Do you think the Puritans would have considered the poem "Huswifery" useful?

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One of the most significant consequences of the Protestant Reformation was the sanctification of the ordinary, the everyday. By valuing all of life in relation to God, Protestants endowed each and every activity with sacred significance. Work was the most important of these; it was thought to bring the individual...

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One of the most significant consequences of the Protestant Reformation was the sanctification of the ordinary, the everyday. By valuing all of life in relation to God, Protestants endowed each and every activity with sacred significance. Work was the most important of these; it was thought to bring the individual Christian believer closer to God. As righteous Protestants, Puritans wholeheartedly subscribed to the Calvinist work ethic, according to which work was held to be an outward sign of one's commitment to Christian values.

That being the case, Puritans may have found "Huswifery" useful insofar as it constitutes an accurate presentation of their core beliefs. At the same time, Puritans, being deeply practical people, didn't have much time for the arts, and so might well have regarded "Huswifery"—irrespective of its message, and the motives that inspired its writing—as an unwelcome distraction from doing the Lord's work.

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On one hand, I would like to say that the Puritans would have found the poem a practical expression of how their labor ties into their spiritual lives.  The poem is focused on God and his work in a very concrete way.  Taylor shows that God's glory can be reflected through the common labors of everyday life.  The poem is about making cloth, which is a long, step by step process.  There are a lot of pieces and steps involved in making something beautiful.  That is how the Puritans would view their Christian work as well.  It takes a long time for a person to truly become something God glorifying.  

On the other hand, I fear that Puritans might view the poem as a waste of time.  It is not the Bible; therefore, it is not God's special revelation.  I think many Puritans would have the attitude that if a person is going to spend time reading, he/she should be reading the Bible.  

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