A thesis comparing To Kill a Mockingbird and A Thousand Splendid Suns?  I'm having some trouble with this; I have some ideas so far but I can't really think of how to expand them into a debatable...

A thesis comparing To Kill a Mockingbird and A Thousand Splendid Suns?

 

I'm having some trouble with this; I have some ideas so far but I can't really think of how to expand them into a debatable thesis.

--The concept of good vs. evil, i.e. having to endure through evil to achieve goodness, like Mariam enduring her entire life to sacrifice herself for Laila's sake

I would really appreciate any help, as I am having quite a bit of trouble.

Thanks in advance!

Expert Answers
bullgatortail eNotes educator| Certified Educator

I absolutely love both of these novels, but I had never considered any similarities until I read your post.

Actually, I think you may be able to compare and contrast some of the events regarding Mariam and her relationships with adults (her mother and her husband, particularly) with those of Mayella and the adults who affect her (father Bob and, possibly Tom Robinson).

Like Mariam, Mayella is born into a world where her immediate family is already well-defined: Mayella is a Ewell, the "disgrace of Maycomb," whose father is the most despised man in town. Mariam is a bastard, whose mother fathered her out of wedlock and then was outcast from the house in which she worked. Neither family will ever be able to rise above its extremely low status, and neither Mariam nor Mayella will find a decent companion willing to forgive their past or their family roots.

Both women lose their parent(s), leaving them to deal with a hostile outside world on their own. Neither have ever known happiness (other than Mariam's visits from her father), and their male relationships are disastrous (Mariam with her husband; Mayella with her father and with Tom).

Read the study guide:
A Thousand Splendid Suns

Access hundreds of thousands of answers with a free trial.

Start Free Trial
Ask a Question