Bradbury’s story "There Will Come Soft Rains" includes a poem by Sara Teasdale with the same title. Do the poem and story have the same message? If not, in what way(s) do they differ?

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In the Sara Teasdale poem, the speaker describes nature's response to the destruction of humankind. Rains will come, swallows will circle in the sky, frogs will sing, and flowers will bloom. None of these creatures "will know of the war" that resulted in the destruction of the human race; none will even be aware of our absence. Spring, when it comes, "Would scarcely know that we were gone."

In other words, nature will have no response to our destruction or absence but will simply keep doing what it always has done. Humankind's destruction is discussed as though it is inevitable, the result of our worst impulses, and there is a mood of peace once we are gone.

Outside the home, one side of the white house is black, "burned" and "evenly free of its white paint" except for five spots. In silhouette, the narrator describes the shape of a man mowing the lawn, a woman bending to pick flowers, a small boy, a small girl, and a ball. The house "stood alone in a city of rubble and ashes," and a...

(The entire section contains 4 answers and 1055 words.)

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Last Updated by eNotes Editorial on February 11, 2020
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Last Updated by eNotes Editorial on February 11, 2020