John F. Kennedy's Presidency Questions and Answers

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Are there similies in John F. Kennedy's Inaugural Address, and what are examples?

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Beyond the simile mentioned above ("Now the trumpet summons us again—not as a call to bear arms, though arms we need—not as a call to battle"), Kennedy's inaugural address does not use any similes. Similes are comparisons that use the words "like" or "as." Similes are similar to metaphors: metaphors describe one thing in terms of another without using "like" or "as." Both similes and metaphors are the language of poetry and the imagination, and while Kennedy primarily uses declarative language, he also employs a few metaphors such as "the torch has been passed," which means not literally that people are handing torches to each other but that a younger generation is taking over power in the nation. He also uses a metaphor in the following: "those who foolishly sought power by riding the back of the tiger ended up inside." Again,...

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