Take one character from "The Night the Ghost Got In" by James Thurber and give two different examples of characterization. 

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The narrator in James Thurber's story acquaints the reader with his mother, a determined but excitable person. Thurber uses verbs, adverbs, adjectives, and descriptive passages to characterize her.

After the narrator and his brother wake her up by slamming doors while looking for the ghost, Mother "demanded" to know...

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The narrator in James Thurber's story acquaints the reader with his mother, a determined but excitable person. Thurber uses verbs, adverbs, adjectives, and descriptive passages to characterize her.

After the narrator and his brother wake her up by slamming doors while looking for the ghost, Mother "demanded" to know what they were doing. When she wants to call the police but the phone is downstairs, "mother made one of her quick, incomparable decisions." Saying "one of" implies that she is in the habit of making quick decisions. Although "incomparable" has many possible meanings, one anticipates that such decisions did not always generate positive outcomes.

In this case, Mother quickly opens the window and throws a shoe at the house next door, breaking a window and waking up the neighbors. After some shouting back and forth, they call the police. Mother is next shown to be an excitable as well as decisive person.

[M]other suddenly made as if to throw another shoe, not because there was further need of it but, as she later explained, because the thrill of heaving a shoe through a window glass had enormously taken her fancy.

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If the character of Herman is examined, the narrator's brother, it is clear that his character is developed in a number of ways. Firstly, characterisation occurs through the way he speaks and how that speech is described. Note that when his brother wakes him, Herman responds in the following way:

"Awp" he said in the low, hopeless tone of a despondent beagle...

This a rather humorous and funny comparison to make, as the narrator describes his brother to be a "despondent beagle" rather than a human, and the sound he makes shows that Herman is very afraid and fearful. This is supported by the next method of characterisation, which is the background information given to us by the narrator himself, who reveals, "he always had suspected that something would 'get him' in the night." This, combined with the way that he is described as being rather "green" when his mother sees them clearly supports his characterisation as a young boy who is full of fear and terror at the supposed "ghosts" who are lurking downstairs.

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