Is there a place in the classroom for God?Is there a place in the classroom for God? In France, all crucifixes, prayers and religious symbols (including Muslim girl's headscarfs and Sikh boy's...

Is there a place in the classroom for God?

Is there a place in the classroom for God?

In France, all crucifixes, prayers and religious symbols (including Muslim girl's headscarfs and Sikh boy's turbans) are banned in school. The French government says that schools are connected to the state and must be kept distinct and separate from religion.

Is this a progressive move? Should religion be completely removed from state schools.

Asked on by stegny

7 Answers | Add Yours

litteacher8's profile pic

litteacher8 | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

I was confronted with this question first hand on September 11, 2001.  I was teaching 8th grade at a public school when the tower attacks came.  I was on the other side of the country.  We had a moment of silence that day, and I watched my diverse group students pray in many different ways.  Yes, there is a place for God in the classroom.

besure77's profile pic

besure77 | Middle School Teacher | (Level 1) Senior Educator

Posted on

I agree with one of the previous responders-sometimes religious discussions pop up during school and I do not think there is any harm in discussing these things. I also do not see any harm in students wearing religious symbols, such as crosses, during school. I do not think that religion should be completely removed from school. Students should be able to express themselves, as long as they are not imposing on anyone.

accessteacher's profile pic

accessteacher | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

I feel with questions like this that it is important for students at least to be exposed to the strong Christian traditions of their countries in the case of the USA. Of course this needs to be done with sensitivity and in a way that does not alienate others, but at the same time these students do not exist in a vacuum - they exist in a country that has "In God We Trust" printed on every bill.

dastice's profile pic

dastice | Elementary School Teacher | (Level 1) Assistant Educator

Posted on

God is very present in the lives of many of my students, and theological discussions occasionally arise.  I feel it is appropriate to allow these discussions to run their course, provided respect is modeled throughout.  As the teacher, I stay as impartial as possible, though if students ask me directly about my beliefs I will answer honestly.  I make sure to follow up any religious discussion with the acknowledgement that the world is full of many different beliefs and that it is okay to disagree.

I see no problem with people being free to wear symbols of their religion at school, as much of what we wear represents our beliefs in some fashion or another (I am remembering the concert t-shirts I wore every day in high school).  The important thing would be to allow all religions to be represented in this manner.  If a cross is allowed, a turban must be as well.

Freedom to show or discuss religion in school is much different than teaching/preaching a religion, which has no place in the public education system.  School is a place for students to learn, and learning how to respect people who do not share our beliefs is vital to real-world success.

pohnpei397's profile pic

pohnpei397 | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

France is a lot more militantly secular than the US because of their history of having a state religion.  We have not gone this far and I do not think that we should.

I believe, though, that the only place for God in the public school classroom is in the hearts and minds of the people in the room.  I think that religious t-shirts and crucifix necklaces and such are fine.  But I do not think that there is any call to have public prayers or anything like that.

dhpraiser's profile pic

dhpraiser | Elementary School Teacher | (Level 1) eNoter

Posted on

God is very present in the lives of many of my students, and theological discussions occasionally arise.  I feel it is appropriate to allow these discussions to run their course, provided respect is modeled throughout.  As the teacher, I stay as impartial as possible, though if students ask me directly about my beliefs I will answer honestly.  I make sure to follow up any religious discussion with the acknowledgement that the world is full of many different beliefs and that it is okay to disagree.

I see no problem with people being free to wear symbols of their religion at school, as much of what we wear represents our beliefs in some fashion or another (I am remembering the concert t-shirts I wore every day in high school).  The important thing would be to allow all religions to be represented in this manner.  If a cross is allowed, a turban must be as well.

Freedom to show or discuss religion in school is much different than teaching/preaching a religion, which has no place in the public education system.  School is a place for students to learn, and learning how to respect people who do not share our beliefs is vital to real-world success.

I totally agree with you! I have had opportunity to pray w/ parents and students at their request. However, I do not interject my beliefs in the class as a whole UNLESS someone asks, and then it depends on the age of the student. The younger ones, I will indicate need to talk w/ their parents and then I give the parent a heads up about their child's question or statement.

eslamgewshy's profile pic

eslamgewshy | Student, Undergraduate | (Level 1) Honors

Posted on

i think that freedom should be in all places and kinds of life.we can't be obliged to do anything may contradict with our religious beliefs .if my actiond dont hurt you,so you shouldn't kill my freedom

 

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