There are clear parallels between Oedipus in the first place and Creon in the third play, Antigone.In what ways are the two men alike? How does their hamartia play into the tragedies of their ives?...

There are clear parallels between Oedipus in the first place and Creon in the third play, Antigone.

In what ways are the two men alike? How does their hamartia play into the tragedies of their ives? Be specific and deal with both men?

 

Expert Answers
mstultz72 eNotes educator| Certified Educator

Both men are kings, obviously.  They are kings because of their pride, hubris, which both guides them in attaining their power and inevitably leads to their downfall.  Oedipus uses his pride in his ability to be a just ruler; he solved the riddle of the Sphinx and thus ended the first plague of Thebes.  Now, he wants to do the same in the current plague.  Creon, too, takes pride in having defeated the Seven Armies Against Thebes, and now, he wants all traitors left unburied.

Neither men understand women.  Oedipus has married and lived with his mother for years, but he fails to uncover either her or his past.  Creon does not understand Antigone's status as a woman, that women are traditionally responsible for bathing and burying the dead.

Neither man obeys gods' law; instead, each follows his own.  Oedipus' proclomations that the murderer will be exiled are his own death sentence.  Creon, too, puts civic law above the divine, and it also backfires on him, as his son, wife, and future daughter-in-law all suicide.

Both men are left to suffer.  Neither suicide, like their wives.  They are tragic heroes who have been born to suffer.  As these tragedies are part of a religious festival, their lives have been spared on the stage, even though they both wish for death.