Are there any Shakespeare plays out there that have been rewritten to be read at a 4-6 grade reading level?I want to introduce classic literature to some of my 4th grade students and I think...

Are there any Shakespeare plays out there that have been rewritten to be read at a 4-6 grade reading level?

I want to introduce classic literature to some of my 4th grade students and I think Shakespeare may be a good place to start.

Expert Answers
ladyvols1 eNotes educator| Certified Educator

The best recommendation I can give you is "Tales from Shakespeare" by Charles and Mary Lamb.  These stories are not written in play format, but the plays are all there in story form to enjoy. All the classic tales are there and very easy to read.  This is how my great-grandmother started me on Shakespeare, and I moved from there to the plays.  Often she would let us read the story and then she would read actual parts of the plays to me.  This book can be purchased from most bookstores, and you can also find it online.  I hope this helps. 

"The "TALES FROM SHAKESPEARE" consists of Shakespeare’s plays rewritten, supposedly for children but actually of such high quality that they have been immensely popular with adults also. For the volume Lamb rewrote six tragedies and his sister Mary rewrote fourteen comedies. "

Ashley Kannan eNotes educator| Certified Educator

There are versions of Shakespeare's plays written for upper elementary and middle school students.  They are written with a younger audience in mind.  The basic elements are still present, but there is an expanded role for off stage elements, such as "howling wind" or other elements that add to the Shakespearean elements of the play.   The productions' scripts are written with the need for both male and female roels.  The website listed on the Rafe Eqsuith and the Hobart Shakespeareans is devoted to exploring the work of a teacher in an urban setting and struggling school district who is using Shakespeare with his student to enhance reading scores and develop classroom notions of community.

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