Are there any sample thesis for each individual section of the book?

1 Answer | Add Yours

ms-charleston-yawp's profile pic

Noelle Thompson | High School Teacher | eNotes Employee

Posted on

Although your question isn't clear, one can certainly generate general thesis statements for each individual section of the book; however, eNotes does not provide thesis papers.  If that is what you are looking for, then feel free to peruse the internet for less reputable sites. 

Assuming you are looking for the former, I am happy to help you.  Here are the different sections (meditations/observations) and the general idea behind them:

Mr. Palomar’s Vacation

Mr. Palomar begins by contemplating the waves on the beach.  Instead of wondering about the changeable waves themselves, Mr. Palomar focuses on himself as an individual observing the wave and how that observation is different from others'. 

Mr. Palomar in the City

Where the first section focuses on the waves in the midst of nature, the second section focuses on confinement of nature in the city.  Here Mr. Palomar sees a gorilla in a zoo in Barcelona, Spain.  The gorilla simply clings to a tire, and Mr. Palomar thinks he can understand the gorilla and "his need for something to hold tight while everything eludes him, a thing with which to allay the anguish of isolation,of the sentence of being always considered a living phenomenon."

We all turn in our hands an old, empty tire through which we try to reach some final meaning, which words cannot achieve.

The Silences of Mr. Palomar

Now Mr. Palomar realizes that his ego is getting in the way of real observation.  He wants to observe from the outside, now. 

From the mute distance of things a sign must come, a summons, a wink: one thing detaches itself from the other things with the intention of signifying something.

Mr. Palomar decides to become "dead" to be a better observer.  He becomes the subject of the study; however, because of the huge paradox of being both the observer and the object, Mr. Palomar eventually dies. 

Sources:

We’ve answered 318,929 questions. We can answer yours, too.

Ask a question