The Spirit of the Laws by Montesquieu

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What is the aim of liberty in The Spirit of the Laws?

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In The Spirit of the Laws Montesquieu defines liberty as "the tranquility of mind that results from the conviction that everybody has his security." This indicates that for Montesquieu, no less than the Founding Fathers, liberty could only arise if the appropriate institutions were in place, institutions that guaranteed the citizen's security under the rule of law. But this liberty that Montesquieu prizes so highly is not the right to do whatever we want, whenever we want; Montesquieu doesn't confuse liberty with license. Under the rule of law, liberty resides in "the power to do what one should will, and not to be compelled to do what one should not will to do." In other words, citizens...

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