Are there any literary devices in act IV, scene III lines 115-131 in Shakespeare's Macbeth? You do not have to tell me what they are, but I have been looking for an hour and have yet to find any....

Are there any literary devices in act IV, scene III lines 115-131 in Shakespeare's Macbeth? You do not have to tell me what they are, but I have been looking for an hour and have yet to find any. Please just tell me if there even are any.

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shake99 | Teacher | (Level 3) Senior Educator

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In William Shakespeare’s Macbeth, like any other play or book, literary devices can be difficult to find for the unpracticed eye. But the truth is, in any work of literary art every word is part of one literary device or another.

Think of it this way: plot itself is technically a literary device, and everything that happens is part of the plot. Characterization is also a literary device, so everything that a character does or says or experiences is part of its characterization.

You are probably trying to find something more specific, like allusion or symbolism or metaphor, etc. There is not always one of these types of literary devices present in every line of Macbeth, or any other work, for that matter. However, I will tell you that there is an example of a certain type of metaphor called personification within lines 115-131. Look up the definition of personification and see if you can find the example within those lines.

Otherwise, you could think about how these lines advance the plot or serve to further characterize Malcolm or Macduff.

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