Is there an example of appearance vs. reality in act 4 of Hamlet, regarding the revenge plotline?

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In act IV, scene 7, Claudius and Laertes plot a deceptive revenge on Hamlet for his killing of Polonius. Claudius is desperate to get rid of Hamlet , knowing that Hamlet knows that he, Claudius, killed his father. Laertes quite simply and hot-headedly wants revenge and wants it...

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In act IV, scene 7, Claudius and Laertes plot a deceptive revenge on Hamlet for his killing of Polonius. Claudius is desperate to get rid of Hamlet, knowing that Hamlet knows that he, Claudius, killed his father. Laertes quite simply and hot-headedly wants revenge and wants it now. Claudius uses this to his advantage.

The two plot to arrange a sword fight between Hamlet and Laertes. Laertes will use a blade that is sharpened, not dull (as would be normal for such a contest). Laertes will also poison the tip of his blade, and Claudius will make sure a cup of poisoned wine is on hand in case all else fails.

This will appear to be a "ceremonial" fencing match where nobody gets hurt, but in reality, it will function, Laertes and Claudius hope, as a way to murder Hamlet.

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A possible example of the appearance vs. reality theme comes in Hamlet's encounter with the Norwegian captain in Act IV Scene iv. Hamlet's truly shamed by the bravery of all those Norwegian troops off to risk their necks in a war over a worthless plot of land. It throws into sharp relief his own chronic indecision in executing his revenge plot against Claudius. Hamlet has been keen to convey the appearance of decisiveness, most of all to himself, but the reality has been completely different. He's spent so much time vacillating over what to do, that he feels like such a coward when confronted with the unthinking bravery of the Norwegian troops. But even then, Hamlet's sudden resolve to avenge his father's death conceals more than it reveals. It's notable that he says "My thoughts be bloody," not "My deeds are bloody." Despite the appearance of new-found determination, in reality Hamlet's still thinking, rather than doing.

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Hamlet pretends to be mad throughout the play in order to manipulate other characters, namely Claudius. In Act 3, Scene 4, Hamlet kills Polonius and then talks to his dead father's ghost. Gertrude sees this and declares he is mad. In Act 4, Scene 1, Gertrude tells Claudius that Hamlet killed Polonius. It is debatable whether or not she truly thinks Hamlet is mad, but she does tell Claudius that Hamlet's madness made him commit the crime. This is an attempt to somehow justify Hamlet's actions, his madness being an affect of grieving for his father. 

To draw apart the body he hath killed,

O'er whom-his very madness, like some ore

Among a mineral of metals base, 

Shows itself pure-a weeps for what is done. (IV.i.23-26)

She claims he is mad but also "weeps" for what he's done. Gertrude tries to create the illusion that Hamlet feels remorse for the murder. His madness is appearance as is this alleged remorse; he really is unaffected by Polonius' death. Also, Claudius sends Hamlet to England, telling Gertrude this is for his protection. However, Claudius does this to plan the murder of Hamlet. There is a lot of playing with appearance versus reality simply because of all the lying. But overall in Hamlet, the major instance of appearance versus reality is Hamlet's feigned madness. 

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