In "The Sniper," examine how the sniper feels upon first realizing that he has killed his enemy.

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Upon first realizing that the sniper has killed his enemy, he shows excitement.

O'Flaherty describes the sniper with a driving focus when he starts his mission.  This can be seen in the story's opening as the sniper possesses "the cold gleam of a fanatic."  The sniper's physical appearance is described...

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Upon first realizing that the sniper has killed his enemy, he shows excitement.

O'Flaherty describes the sniper with a driving focus when he starts his mission.  This can be seen in the story's opening as the sniper possesses "the cold gleam of a fanatic."  The sniper's physical appearance is described as "thin and ascetic," communicating an almost- spiritual commitment to his mission. 

The sniper's purpose is recognized when he shoots and hits his target. He "uttered a cry of joy."  When the sniper first realizes that he has killed his enemy, he is happy that he has accomplished the job that he set out to do. However, O'Flaherty is deliberate in suggesting something more to the sniper. The sniper begins to realize the full implications of what he has done.  When the sniper is forced to think about killing his enemy, "the lust of battle died in him." His initial excitement is replaced by "remourse," as "sweat stood out in beads on his forehead."  What was once happiness is now replaced with the sniper "cursing the war, cursing himself, cursing everybody."  These details help to offset the sniper's initial feelings of happiness and enthusiasm that he felt upon first realizing that he killed his enemy.

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