The Crofts are portrayed as one of the few happily married couples in the novel. What is it about their relationship that seems so different from the other relationships portrayed in Persuasion?

In Persuasion, what is different about the Crofts' relationship that makes them one of the few happily married couples in the novel is that they have true affection for one another and also have much in common, including their shared love of the sea and travel. They also both seem to be bright people who are truly interested in one another. The Admiral treats his brother-in-law more like a brother, reflecting his respect for Frederick and esteem for his wife.

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The Crofts are portrayed as one of the few happily married couples in the novel. Unlike so many of the others who have married because it is the expedient thing to do or for financial reasons, they seem to have married because they have true affection for one another. They also both seem to be bright, thinking people who are truly interested in one another.

Their relationship also seems so different from the other relationships portrayed in the book because it seems so much more a relationship of equals, at least for the time in which Austen wrote. They respect one another and listen to one another. The Admiral has his career, and his wife is both supportive and interested. In fact, they are both interested in one another in much more than the superficial way that other couples in the novel express just to be polite.

They are also unlike other couples who have so little in common. Mary and Charles are one such example. Conversely, the Crofts have much in common, including their shared love of the sea and travel.

Whenever possible, Mrs. Croft has taken the opportunity to accompany her husband on his sea voyages. She enjoys the sea, and she enjoys being with him, a sign of how much they both like one another’s company.

It is also clear that their affection and concern for one another includes care and concern for their extended family. The Admiral treats his brother-in-law more like a brother than an in-law. This is an expression of his respect for Captain Wentworth, as well as how much he esteems his wife.

Last Updated by eNotes Editorial on May 20, 2020
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