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Teenagers should be allowed more freedom. Give your views for or against the topic.

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The only way to learn to make good choices is to have the freedom to make bad ones. If kids make smaller bad choices when they are little, they will make better choices as teenagers. The same is true of teenagers making choices on their own to learn how to be an adult.
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I agree with post #5 especially the last sentence.  My answer would be which teenagers and which freedoms?  How old the teens are whether 13 or 19 makes a big difference.  Freedoms should come in small steps so that the teens are ready to move forward having proven their ability to handle each small movement.  It is also the time when teens make mistakes and need someone  there to help them understand what went wrong, take a step backward, analyze, and again take a step forward.  Freedoms need to be practiced so that teens are ready for the world outside of home. Without practice, teens are unprepared for the decisions which they must make.  Also, when teens have proven themselves trustworthy over time, most rules should become negotiable.  A few are ironclad such as no driving drunk, but others such as curfews, or other rules which protect the young teen, can become flexible to allow for the teen's growing maturity.  As for social rules, teens need to discuss these with parents or other important adults.  Drinking, sex, pregnancy, abuse are all topics teens should have their own rules about so that they know what their own response will be ahead of time.  Unfortunately, too many teens don't have anyone with whom to discuss these topics .

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Many excellent points are made in the previous posts. I'm sure teenagers have been debating this issue for centuries, and I don't believe teens today are any better suited to handle extended freedoms than they were in the 1800s or 1900s. I believe teens should be given more freedoms as they grow older, and as long as the individual is responsible with his/her decision-making, further freedoms sould be allowed. Teens who take advantage of their extended freedoms and run into problems--bad grades, drugs, arrest, etc.--should expect restrictions to be put in place by their parents. Most teens probably don't recognize the importance of two examples found in the previous posts: Brain activity is not complete until people are in their early 20s, and life experience is something that only comes with age.

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I would agree that some teenagers can handle more freedoms. Some cannot. The teenage years should be a time when children test their abilities but still have a safety net of sorts. It should be a time to move into adulthood but teens are necessarily ready for all the freedoms they desire. For instance, a teen who is participating in underage drinking or drug use might not be ready for the freedoms they have. Such a teen might need a curfew or less freedom to attend the venues where the drug use is taking place. On the other hand, a teen who proves responsible in borrowing a parents car might be ready for more freedom such as a car of their own. It really depends on the individual. I don't think you can make a blanket statement about the freedom of all teens. 

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I would suggest that teenagers who have proven themselves capable of making good decisions should be allotted more freedoms. On the other hand, those who have had "issues" following the rules should not be allotted more freedoms. Basically, those teenagers who have proven themselves to be trustworthy should be allowed to do more. That said, once he or she makes a decision which goes against the rules, the "reins" should be tightened again.

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