"Teach me, O Lord the way of thy statutes; and I shall keep it unto the end.  Give me understanding and I shall keep thy law; yea, I shall observe it with my whole heart." 1.  How many pronouns...

"Teach me, O Lord the way of thy statutes; and I shall keep it unto the end.  Give me understanding and I shall keep thy law; yea, I shall observe it with my whole heart."

1.  How many pronouns are in the above passage?

2.  How many of the pronouns are in the objective case?

3.  How many of the pronouns are in the nominative case?

4.  How many of the pronouns are in the possessive case?

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mwestwood | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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1. There are 10 pronouns in the passage from Psalm 119 of the Bible. They are as follows: me, thy,(archaic for you), I, it, me, I, thy, I, it, my

2. There are 4 pronouns which are in the Objective Case. They are as follows: me, it, me, it

3. There are 3 pronouns which are in the Nominative Case. They are as follows: I, I, I

4. There are 3 pronouns which are in the Possessive Case. They are as follows: thy, thy, my

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For further reference:

Over a thousand years ago, the English language relied greatly on different forms of a word to demonstrate how the word was being used in a sentence, just as Latin did. For example, the Old English noun for dog was hund when it acted as a subject and hunde when it acted as an indirect object. (These spelling changes can be observed in such works written in Old English such as The Canterbury Tales) But, this use of form to indicate case is no longer used with nouns; instead, it is the position of a noun that indicates its case.

Certain pronouns, however, still change form to indicate how they are used in a sentence.

The Nominative Case is used when the pronoun is the subject of a verb or the predicate nominative (the pronoun follows a linking verb such as the forms of to be--is, are, was, were, has been, have been, will have been.  e.g. The winner is she. The intruder appears to be he. (Note: Conversational English will use her or him, but in writing one should use the correct case)

  • Nominative Case pronouns

Singular Forms: I, you,[thou] he, she, it,
Plural Forms:we, you, [thou] they 

The Objective Case is used when the pronoun is indirect [Maurice gave me his ring] or direct object [Susan phoned her yesterday] or object of a preposition [Jane and Joe are traveling with them]

  • Objective Case pronouns 

Singular Forms: me, you,[thou], him, her, it 
Plural Forms: us,  you [thou], them

The Possessive Case is used to show possession, or ownership. 

  • Possessive Case pronouns

Singular Forms: my, mine, your, yours, his her, hers, its 
Plural Forms: our, ours, your, yours [thy], their, theirs 
Note: The forms mine, yours, his (same form), hers, and theirs are used without nouns.  e.g. This pen is hers; that one is his.

Sources:

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