A Tale Of Two Cities Motif: RedemptionIn A Tale Of Two Cities, what events/people in the book shows redemption the best? The more answers you have, the easier my life will be. :) The faster you...

A Tale Of Two Cities Motif: Redemption

In A Tale Of Two Cities, what events/people in the book shows redemption the best? The more answers you have, the easier my life will be. :) The faster you answer, the more time I'll have to think about it.

Asked on by soulet303

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litteacher8's profile pic

litteacher8 | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

There are many examples of resurrection and redemption in the book, as others have pointed out.  I would like to focus on one character: Sydney Carton.  Sydney seems at first to be a despicable character.  He is an alcoholic, he wastes his talent, he does all of the work and let Stryver take all of the credit, and he is full of so much self-loathing that he can barely get up in the morning.  He is desperately in love with Lucie Manette, and yet he never talks to her and he certainly never tells her.  He seems like he is rotting from the inside out.

Despite all of this, Carton has some good qualities.  He is brilliant, and he uses his mind to help those he cares about.  He watches over the Manette-Darnay family, and protects them.  Although he can be sarcastic and bitter even when doing good deeds, Carton gives everything he has to protect and serve the family.  His last brilliant legal strategy is to trade places with Darnay, therefore sacrificing himself for the woman he loves.  He knows he can’t have her, and instead of being relieved and going after the grieving widow he takes her husband’s place, redeeming himself with those famous last words:

“It is a far, far better thing that I do than I have ever done; it is a far, far better rest that I go to than I have ever known.”

 In saying this, Carton acknowledges his redemption.

mwestwood's profile pic

mwestwood | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

  • With the words "Recalled to Life," Mr. Lorry finds Dr. Manette redeemed after being "buried" in the Bastille. 
  • Charles Darnay is redeemed when Sydney Carton creates doubt in the minds of the judge and the jury.
  • Later in the novel, Roger is recalled to life when he goes to Paris and Dr. Manette procures his release.
  • Roger Cly appears to have been recalled to life as he appears as Barsad at the Conciergerie as Basard.
  • Charles Darnay is recalled to life as Sydney Carton takes his place.
  • Jerry Cruncher is truly redeemed and no longer practices his gruesome occupation.
auntlori's profile pic

Lori Steinbach | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

I'm not sure our primary goal is to make your life easier; however, I am glad you'll be thinking about what we write, so I'll get things started. The most obvious example of redemption in A Tale of Two Cities is Sydney Carton's sacrificing his life for Charles Darnay. That's a completely biblical concept of redeeming, sacrificial love. In addition, his own life is redeemed by the act, as he moves from a dissolute wastrel to a man capable of the finest things.

soulet303's profile pic

soulet303 | Student, Grade 9 | (Level 2) eNoter

Posted on

I'm not sure our primary goal is to make your life easier; however, I am glad you'll be thinking about what we write, so I'll get things started. The most obvious example of redemption in A Tale of Two Cities is Sydney Carton's sacrificing his life for Charles Darnay. That's a completely biblical concept of redeeming, sacrificial love. In addition, his own life is redeemed by the act, as he moves from a dissolute wastrel to a man capable of the finest things.

I'm glad that you made my life easier. Is there anything else?

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