A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens

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In A Tale of Two Cities, how is the famous last statement of Sydney Carton true for him? Book 3-Chapter 15 -The last words of this chapter are some of the most famous ever written: “It is a far, far...

In A Tale of Two Cities, how is the famous last statement of Sydney Carton true for him?

Book 3-Chapter 15 -The last words of this chapter are some of the most famous ever written:

“It is a far, far better thing that I do, than I have ever done; it is a far far better rest that I go to than I have ever known.” (Pg. 343)

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Charles Dickens’ novel, A Tale of Two Cities, like most of his work, contains a number of complex and deeply drawn characters, including Sydney Carton. In A Tale of Two Cities, Dickens creates and develops a theme of regeneration. France, at least as far as the common man is concerned, is regenerated through revolution. Dr. Manette is regenerated by the love of his daughter Lucy. And Sydney Carton, at first despicable, drunken, and hopelessly narcissistic, is regenerated by own feelings and love for Lucy.

The quotation in your question occurs as Carton is sacrificing his own life in place of Charles Darnay, Lucy’s husband. Carton considers himself to have been “saved,” in a manner of speaking, by Lucy because she restored his appreciation of life. He...

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