Is table salt ionic, metalic or covalent compound?  

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Table salt is a common name for sodium chloride, chemically represented as NaCl. Sodium chloride is an ionic compound, in which one atom loses an electron, while the other gains it. Sodium, being a metal, readily loses an electron to from the cation, `Na^+` . Chlorine, on the other hand,...

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Table salt is a common name for sodium chloride, chemically represented as NaCl. Sodium chloride is an ionic compound, in which one atom loses an electron, while the other gains it. Sodium, being a metal, readily loses an electron to from the cation, `Na^+` . Chlorine, on the other hand, being a non-metal, readily gains this electron to form the chloride anion, `Cl^-` . When we dissolve table salt, sodium chloride, in water, it readily break down into the participating ions: sodium cation and chloride anion. Ionic compounds generally have higher melting and boiling points as compared to covalent compounds. These compounds are generally solid at room temperature. 

In comparison, covalent compounds are those, where the reacting species share electrons amongst themselves, instead of outright lose or gain of electron/s.

Hope this helps. 

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