What details support that Faulkner uses symbolism in "A Rose for Emily"?

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Frames also seem to be symbolic in "A Rose for Emily." One of the examples is the scene where the narrator is describing Miss Emily's father as standing in the foreground and framed by the doorway as he held would be suitors at bay. Meanwhile Miss Emily is framed in the background. Also he references framing with reference to her crayon picture of her father in the gold frame. The whole story is framed in the idea of traditions dying out as time passes.

The single grey hair on the pillow is symbolic.  The old hair on the pillow signifies that Emily is an anachronism in the town now, lying with corpses as all that she has had to be proud of is also dead.  Her desperate attempt to maintain a hold upon the past has failed and she is a "fallen monument" who left a part of her behind in the grey hair.

Faulkner calls Emily a "fallen monument" and an "idol in a niche" to suggest how the town views her and to connect her to the idea of the old, genteel Southern ways.  The modern townspeople...

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