John Donne's Songs and Sonnets by John Donne

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What are some of the satirical aspects of John Donne's poem "The Sun Rising"?

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To satirize is to poke fun at or mock something. In this poem, the speaker mocks the power of the sun. This is similar, if not entirely the same, to Donne's speaker mocking of death in "Death Be Not Proud."

The lover jeers at the sun, calling it a "busy old fool" and asking why it comes around to the lovers' chamber. He tells the sun to go "chide" (lecture) schoolboys or to call people to the hunt, but not to bother lovers.

The speaker also mocks the sun for thinking its rays are strong when his beloved has a more blinding light. The lover calls himself a king because of his beloved. He tells the sun it is not half as happy as he is.

But in addition to mocking the sun, the poem also implicitly mocks the grandiose, exaggerated claims of the lover and his delusions of grandeur in thinking himself greater in his love than kings, princes, or the sun itself.

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The primary focus of Donne's satire in this poem is the speaker himself, a new lover who has on rose-colored glasses and is in the honeymoon...

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