Provide a brief summary of the poem "The West Wind" by John Masefield.

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eir | College Teacher | (Level 3) Adjunct Educator

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This poem has already been answered. Please follow the link:

http://www.enotes.com/homework-help/what-summary-west-wind-by-john-masefield-128015.

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aszerdi | Student, Undergraduate | (Level 1) Valedictorian

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The poem begins in the morning, just after the narrator has finished his chores. He saddles her and rides into the rising sun on the "West Texas trails." He describes his hat, his spurs, and his boots. As he follows railroad tracks he feels close to his roots. His horse is old, so he stops and allows her to rest and drink water by a brook. While she rests, he admires the mountain landscape and an old bridge. He ends the poem stating that the best moments are those when he is out alone with his horse riding the old, Western trails.

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aszerdi's profile pic

aszerdi | Student, Undergraduate | (Level 1) Valedictorian

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I am so sorry. Upon submitting my response, I realized that I had referenced the wrong poem. The following is a summary for "The West Wind."

The poem begins with the narrator describing the West Wind. It is warm and filled with the cries of birds. He never hears it, but it evokes powerful, nostalgic emotions. In the wind he finds daffodils, apple blossoms, and green grass where men lie. Thrushes sing, bidding him home to the blue sky, bright sun, and warm rain. These sights of "merry spring" feed a man's soul and mind. The thrushes bid him again to come to the land where the larks are singing, and those with tired, bruised hearts may rest. The narrator concludes that he must travel a white road to the west, a land where he may rest and where he belongs.

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