What is an analysis of Shakespeare's Sonnet 63?

Expert Answers

An illustration of the letter 'A' in a speech bubbles

The speaker begins with his concern that, one day, his "love" shall be as the speaker is now (line 1)—old—because Time has worn him down (2). Eventually this love's youthfulness will also be drained away (3), his face will become lined and wrinkled (4) when the "morn" of his youth has turned to "age's steepy night" (5), and all the beauty that he possesses now will fade away so that he loses it completely (6–8). In preparation for this, the speaker fortifies himself against the "cruel knife" of age (9–10), and he vows that he will never allow himself to forget his love's beauty (11–12). In the end, he claims that his love's beauty will always continue to live in these lines he has written and that the verse will keep his love "still green": youthful and beautiful forever (13–14).

The poet personifies time, giving it hands and the ability to purposefully crush and wear down a person as they age (2). He also uses a metaphor to compare youth to the morning and age to night...

(The entire section contains 3 answers and 753 words.)

Unlock This Answer Now

Start your 48-hour free trial to unlock this answer and thousands more. Enjoy eNotes ad-free and cancel anytime.

Start your 48-Hour Free Trial
Approved by eNotes Editorial Team
An illustration of the letter 'A' in a speech bubbles
Approved by eNotes Editorial Team