Summarize the introduction and chapters 1 and 2 of Half the Sky. Identify three to five points/ideas/images that are important to you. Explain why these are important, and identify questions and comments.

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To identify three to five important points/ideas/images in the introduction and the first two chapters ofHalf the Sky, think about the personal stories of the girls and how Nicholas D. Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn link their experiences to broader concepts about gender discrimination.

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To identify three to five important points/ideas/images in the introduction and the first two chapters of Half the Sky, think about the personal stories of the girls and how Nicholas D. Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn link their experiences to broader concepts about gender discrimination.

A solid place to start might be the first image. Half the Sky begins with the image of Srey Rath "in a crowded street market." The portrayal of Srey as "bubbly" and "vibrant" helps set the tone for the book. The book will spotlight girls and young women whose spirits have not been defeated by horrific exploitation.

Kristof and WuDunn use Srey to make the point that her story is not uncommon. They write that "at least another two million" girls disappear every year due to "gender discrimination." They then point out how the intensity of gender discrimination differs depending on geographic location. In wealthy countries like the United States, gender discrimination "is usually a matter of unequal pay or underfunded sports teams or unwanted touching from a boss." In other countries, gender discrimination takes on the form of brutal enslavement, like the kind suffered by Srey.

Kristof and WuDunn's juxtaposition of gender discrimination could lead to questions. One might wonder if it's fair, or ethical, to compare different types of gender discrimination as if it's a competition. One could think about how one can talk about the different degrees of discrimination without minimizing anyone's experience.

In chapter 1, one could discuss the image of Meena and how it relates to Srey. One might also talk about the point Kristof and WuDunn make about economic class. Kristof and WuDunn say that brothels in "conservative societies" are populated with "uneducated, low-caste peasants." Thus, "upper-class girls will keep their virtue" while lower-class girls are forced to provide a sexual outlet for men.

Kristof and WuDunn don't juxtapose this "social contract" with class dynamics in the West. Yet one might think about how lower-class women in the United States are exploited and mistreated in terms of the domestic labor and how they are often expected to perform for upper-class women and men.

In chapter 2, an important point might also pertain to the West. Kristof speaks to an Indian officer who's monitoring potential terrorists and pirated goods because it's what the United States cares about. This leads to a discussion about the United States and how it can and can't counter sex trafficking. The book's discussion about the influence of America could produce a broader discussion about America's responsibilities.

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