Summarize the following lines in the poem "The Second coming": "Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold; / Mere anarchy is loosed upon the world, / The blood-dimmed tide is loosed, and everywhere / The ceremony of innocence is drowned."

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In these lines from “The Second Coming,” Yeats is describing the catastrophic effects of the breakdown of the current period of history.

This period, represented by a gyre or spiral, has been in place since the birth of Christ. But in keeping with Yeats's theory of historical change,...

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In these lines from “The Second Coming,” Yeats is describing the catastrophic effects of the breakdown of the current period of history.

This period, represented by a gyre or spiral, has been in place since the birth of Christ. But in keeping with Yeats's theory of historical change, it is rapidly coming to an end. And as it does so, it unleashes powerful forces of bloodshed, anarchy, and chaos.

In the aftermath of the First World War, Yeats sees about him the signs of imminent disaster. All the old certainties have been destroyed or are in the process of being destroyed as the two thousand-year-old gyre comes to its end.

Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold.

In other words, the foundations of the world we know are crumbling.

Mere anarchy is loosed upon the world.

With the breakdown of order and stability comes anarchy, which has now been let loose in the form of revolutions and uprisings against the established order.

The blood-dimmed tide is loosed, and everywhere
The ceremony of innocence is drowned.

Somewhat inevitably, all this chaos, all this anarchy, is accompanied by violence and bloodshed. The transition from his period of history to the next will not be a peaceful one. On the contrary, this will be the end of innocence.

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