Summarize the book Let Your Light Shine: Mobilizing for Justice with Children and Youth by Reginald Blount and Virginia A. Lee.

Let Your Light Shine: Mobilizing for Justice with Children and Youth is a collection of writings that aims to mobilize children’s justice advocates through new ideas about theological education. Part 1 is about the Children’s Defense Fund’s Proctor Institute and how it advocates for children in need. Part 2 is about the history of theological education and how movements like the Freedom Schools movement are informative. Part 3 emphasizes the implications of this advocacy work for future generations.

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Let Your Light Shine: Mobilizing for Justice with Children and Youth is a collection of writings on advocacy for children and theological education. It is edited by Reginald Blount, an assistant professor of Formation, Youth, and Culture at Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary, and Virginia A. Lee, an associate professor of Christian...

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Let Your Light Shine: Mobilizing for Justice with Children and Youth is a collection of writings on advocacy for children and theological education. It is edited by Reginald Blount, an assistant professor of Formation, Youth, and Culture at Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary, and Virginia A. Lee, an associate professor of Christian education at the seminary. The book aims to mobilize advocates of children’s justice by educating them about the history and goals of the Children’s Defense Fund’s (CDF) Samuel DeWitt Proctor Institute for Child Advocacy Ministry.

There are three sections in this book. The first section provides readers with an in-depth history of the CDF. Readers learn about the organization’s founder Marian Wright Edelman, her passion for advocating for children in need, and why we should care about her mission. The authors in this section also connect child advocacy work with the values of their religious community. For instance, in chapter 3, Eileen Lindner outlines nine doctrines for a theology of child advocacy that help readers understand the religious importance of helping children have a voice. Part 2 is about the history of theological education. For instance, Virginia A. Lee writes about the Freedom Schools movement of the 1960s, in which there were free schools for African Americans in the Southern United States. The authors in part 2 also propose some alternatives to current views of religious education. For instance, Ched Meyers criticizes the ideology of professionalism in institutional theological education and advocates for a new approach to Christian education that integrates social analysis with biblical literacy. Finally, part 3 informs readers about the long-term effects of all of this advocacy. This section helps readers understand the importance of this work and how this work should be done to ensure it is effective. For instance, in chapter 10, Janet Wolf writes about how the church should engage with struggling communities by listening to what they really need.

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