Summarize Christina Rossetti's poem "The First Spring Day." What does the last line compare the speaker to?

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thanatassa's profile pic

thanatassa | College Teacher | (Level 3) Educator Emeritus

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Christina Rossetti's poem, "The First Spring Day," is comprised of three six-line stanzas rhymed AABBCC. It is narrated in the first person, although no details concerning the narrator are provided.  The poem is set in winter, on the threshold of spring, with the narrator wondering if and when the spring will appear.

In the first stanza, the narrator muses about whether the traditional first signs of spring are happening or about to happen. The signs of spring mentioned are the sap rising, birds mating, snowdrops and crocuses blooming and the arrival of the first robin.

Next, in the second stanza, the poet wonders if this spring with bring emotional renewal or only renewal of the physical world.

In the final stanza, the narrator suggests that just as the return of the physical signs of spring is inevitable, so to is human renewal after mourning. The final line compares the speaker to both the flowers and the birds (especially the robin) that blossom and sing.

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shmindle | Student, Grade 11 | (Level 2) Honors

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Christina Rossetti's poem "The First Spring Day" is about the anticipation of spring. The poet wonders if the birds and other aspects of nature are dreaming of spring.  In the second stanza, the poet compares the anticipation of spring to her own personal life.  She equates the rather dull life she is living in now to winter, and she hopes that spring will bring more opportunities for her.  In the last stanza, the poet acknowledges that someday, a spring and her spring will inevitably come.  In the last line, the phrase "till I too blossom" compares the speaker to a hopeful seed that will soon bloom into a flower or plant.  

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