Summarize the poem "The City Planners" by Margaret Atwood.

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Margaret Atwood's poem "The City Planners" is written in seven stanzas. The first two stanzas are much longer than the remaining five, and these stanzas provide the main reasoning behind Atwood's disdain for the construction of a city.

In the first stanza, Atwood tells the reader about...

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Margaret Atwood's poem "The City Planners" is written in seven stanzas. The first two stanzas are much longer than the remaining five, and these stanzas provide the main reasoning behind Atwood's disdain for the construction of a city.

In the first stanza, Atwood tells the reader about how she sees the city as she drives around on a Sunday in August. She tells of the city in regards to its offensive sanitaries (pedantic rows of houses, sanitary trees, with only the sound of a mower cutting almost mathematical lines in the grass of lawns).

The second stanza continues to describe the bland and thoughtless planning that went into the building of the city homes. The homes are described as being all even and smelling of the same exact things.

The third stanza shows the reader what is to come of the homes: "the future cracks of the plaster"; while the fourth stanza continues to speak to the inevitable crumbling of the homes.

It is not until the sixth stanza that Atwood comes to name those she blames for the lack of imagination and overall sanitary building of the homes. For Atwood, the planners seem to be more concerned with boxing themselves in, "concealed from each other," than they are with creating beauty.

The seventh and eighth stanza go on to prove Atwood's dislike of those who planned the city. She states that they are simply sketchers who wish to create order in a place of madness.

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