Summarise Napoleon's and Snowball's different approaches to the leadership of Animal Farm(Please include their perspectives and explain how each pig tries to obtain leadership.)

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mwestwood | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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In George Orwell's fable, Animal Farm, Snowball is much more of a socialist than is the dictatorial Napoleon. 

Snowball

  • He reduces the Seven Commandments for those who cannot read to "Four Legs Good, Two Legs Bad."
  • Snowball leads the animals against invaders at the Battle of the Cowshed
  • He designs windmills that will reduce labor for the animals by producing electricity.  Snowball is open about showing his designs and explaining how the windmills will work.
  • Snowball suggests that the creation of the windmill be put to a vote. And, his speech in its support is eloquent
  • Regarding the defence of the farm, Snowball argues that more pigeons must be sent to create more rebellions; with enough rebellions there would be no need for defense.

Napoleon

  • Napoleon hires a propaganda man, Squealer who changes what was said or the Commandments. 
  • When Snowball wants the windmill, he argues that the great need of the moment is to increase food production and that time spent on the windmill would waste time and lead to starvation
  • Napoleon argues against Snowball's idea of creating more animal farms.  Instead, he advocates more weapons of defense.
  • His main goal is the consolidation of power. When Snowball calls for a vote on the windmill.  Napoleon calls in his dogs who terrorize Snowball, running him off the farm.
  • Later, after Snowball has been run off, Napoleon orders the construction of a windmill; Squealer convinces the animals that the idea was Napoleon's from the beginning.
  • Napoleon has all the plan meetings canceled. 
  • Gradually, with Napoleon the Seven Commandments are altered, such as the time Napoleon trades with a neighboring farm. Yet, Squealer convinces most of the animals that they were always what they are now
  • Rather than reducing the animals' workload, it is increased under Napoleon's rule.
  • Napoleon and the other pigs do not live as the other animals. He and his cronies have moved into the big house. And, Napoleon sleeps in the beds, so he has the commandment changed to "No animal shall sleep in a bed with sheets."
  • When the windmill falls down, Napoleon blames this on Snowball and dictatorially pronounces a death-sentence upon him.
  • Napoleon begins a period of "purging,"  executing those suspected of activities counter to his desires.
  • Napoleon and other pigs begin to drink
  • The animals work harder and receive less than they did under the leadership of Snowball.
  • Napoleon has yet another commandment altered.  This time it is one about drink.
  • He terrorizes all the animals but the pigs.  Boxer, having become ill, is shipped to a glue factory.
  • The simple maxim of "Four Legs Good, Two Bad," has been turned around to "Four Legs Bad, Two Legs are Better."
  • Napoleon and his friends enjoy the luxuries. They drink, sleep in the beds, and party with humans.
  • The Seven Commandments have been replaced by one,

"All animals are equal, but some animals are more equal than others."

  • Napoleon calls for a meeting with the human farmers, and the workers can barely see any difference between the pigs and the fat people.
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