Discuss the struggle for black equality as soon as the slaves were emancipated.The struggle for black equality began as soon as the slaves were emancipated. Trace the course of this struggle,...

Discuss the struggle for black equality as soon as the slaves were emancipated.

The struggle for black equality began as soon as the slaves were emancipated. Trace the course of this struggle, describing goals of African Americans over the course of time (how do they change?), the leaders of the fight, the opponents of equal treatment, and their success and failures. Cover the period from World War I and II, and the Civil Rights movement of the 1950's and 1960's.

Asked on by jjsmith432

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Ashley Kannan | Middle School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

If the scope of this question is to analyze different notions of the social and political good for African- Americans post Civil War, I think we begin to see much in the way of change and evolution.  Following Appomattox, the reality for African Americans was how to achieve "the dream" during the Plessy vs. Ferguson era of segregation.  This was marked by Reconstruction initiatives that sought to limit the economic, political, and social notion of the good for African-Americans.  The vision of how African- Americans were to view consciousness could be seen in terms of the philosophies of Booker T. Washington and W.E.B. DuBois, and in this manner, came out the debate of assimilationism and cultural activism.  This means that would the concept of color be something to be overcome or something to be acknowledged.  Within this paradigm, the dream for African- Americans were poised between these ends.  The post World War II predicament for African- Americans became much of the same, as the drive for Civil Rights demanded the same questions as to what constitutes "the dream" for people of color, in particular, African- Americans.  The different thinkers of the time period sought to articulate different visions of the social, economic, and political good.  Malcolm X, Martin Luther King, Jr., and Stokely Carmichael all spoke of different visions of "the dream" for African- Americans in the Civil Rights Era.

pohnpei397's profile pic

pohnpei397 | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

This is beyond the scope of what we're supposed to do on this site, but I'll try to give you what help I can.

WWI  to WWII.  Main goal is integration where it's seen as possible.  For example in the military and in defense industries.  Major leaders would WEB DuBois and A Phillip Randolph.  Successes include orders to integrate defense industries.  Failures include all-black units in both wars, menial jobs only in the Navy in WWII.

Civil Rights Movement: Goal is first integration of schools and then wider integration and the right to vote.  Main leader is Martin Luther King, Jr.  Major successes are Brown v. Board, the Montgomery Boycott and the 1964 Civil Rights Act and 1965 Voting Rights Act.

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