Toni Morrison

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In "Strangers," how does Toni Morrison address the concept of "otherness" and "outsiders," and how might this idea of otherness manifest in the marginalization of groups and individuals in society?

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"Strangers," an essay by Toni Morrison, addresses the concepts of "otherness" and "outsiders" with a personal anecdote.

The anecdote begins with Morrison seeing a woman fishing in her neighbor's garden. Morrison explains that her first feelings towards the woman are welcoming. The woman is using a homemade fishing pole and wearing "a man's hat, a well-worn colorless sweater, and a black dress." Upon viewing the stranger's attire, "a feeling of pleasantness washes over [Morrison]." As she talks to the woman, she does not question the woman's claims about herself: Morrison accepts them as factual. The woman says that her name is "Mother Something," that she lives in a "nearby village," and that she has permission from Morrison's neighbor to fish catfish and eel out of that particular pond as often as she likes. Morrison says that the woman seems "witty and full of the wisdom that older woman seem to have a lock on." She expects to see more of the stranger, to even invite her into her own...

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