In the story of "The Tell Tale Heart" is it right that the narrator is insane and use it as the evidence that he is not guilty of the crime? Why? Please explain...explain why his sanity prove that...

In the story of "The Tell Tale Heart" is it right that the narrator is insane and use it as the evidence that he is not guilty of the crime? Why? Please explain...

explain why his sanity prove that he is not guilty ..please  give an evidence..

Asked on by perl

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appletrees | College Teacher | (Level 2) Educator

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If the narrator were truly insane, he probably would not be able to relate the circumstances of the story or to feel anxiety at the visit of the detective. Since the presence of the detective makes him increasingly uncomfortable, we can surmise that he is feeling guilty and anxious about the possible discovery of his crime. Despite his crimes, the narrator obviously feels that he is responsible and that on some level he deserves punishment. The calm smiling demeanor of the detective unhinges him, showing his paranoia and nervousness, until he can stand it no longer and insists on tearing up the floorboards. This is his way of wanting to confess his crimes and suffer the consequences, proving he understands the moral implications of his actions, which proves he is sane.

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