In the story "Raymond's Run," what is Squeaky's responsibility?  

Expert Answers

An illustration of the letter 'A' in a speech bubbles

In Toni Cade Bambara's short story "Raymond's Run ," Squeaky's main responsibility is to take care of her intellectually disabled older brother, Raymond. In the first paragraph of the short story, Squeaky mentions that her only responsibility is to mind her brother and also says that she is...

Unlock
This Answer Now

Start your 48-hour free trial to unlock this answer and thousands more. Enjoy eNotes ad-free and cancel anytime.

Start your 48-Hour Free Trial

In Toni Cade Bambara's short story "Raymond's Run," Squeaky's main responsibility is to take care of her intellectually disabled older brother, Raymond. In the first paragraph of the short story, Squeaky mentions that her only responsibility is to mind her brother and also says that she is willing to fight anyone who attempts to make fun of Raymond. Squeaky keeps an eye on her brother and makes sure that she walks between him and the road to prevent Raymond from bolting into the middle of the street. She also takes Raymond to the May Day races, where she competes against other girls in her age group and ends up winning first place. While Squeaky is running in the big race, she looks over and sees Raymond running adjacent to her on the other side of the fence. Following the race, Squeaky decides to invest her time in coaching Raymond on how to run; she believes that he can be a competitive athlete.

Approved by eNotes Editorial Team
An illustration of the letter 'A' in a speech bubbles

In Toni Cade Bambara's story "Raymond's Run," Squeaky's family responsibility is to care for her disabled brother, Raymond. Due to Raymond's developmental disabilities he needs constant care to keep him safe and out of trouble. Squeaky takes this responsibility very seriously so that her mother can concentrate on caring for the family home.

Raymond tags along with Squeaky wherever she goes in their Harlem neighborhood. While she practices her breathing and high-stepping, Raymond can be seen prancing along pretending he is driving a carriage. When Raymond runs through the pigeons or into the puddles along the street, Squeaky is quick to correct his actions so that she does not get in trouble at home.

If the other children mock Raymond for his large head or mental deficits, Squeaky quickly comes to his defense by fighting the perpetrator. She is a loyal, caring sister who looks out for her brother's well-being.

Approved by eNotes Editorial Team