In the story, Nick interjects many observation about life and people in his narration, i need 3 more example thats not from chapter 3 and 7.The page number and the quote itself would be great,...

In the story, Nick interjects many observation about life and people in his narration, i need 3 more example thats not from chapter 3 and 7.

The page number and the quote itself would be great, Thank you. if not chapter and quote will be good too.

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susan3smith | High School Teacher | (Level 2) Educator

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In Chapter 1, Nick offers commentary after Daisy laughs that she is sophisticated:

I waited, and sure enough in a moment she looked at me with an absolute smirk on her lovely face as if she ad asserted her membership in rather distinguished secret sciety to which she and Tom belonged.

This rather subtle observation about the tie between Daisy and Tom that exists despite Tom's philandering becomes quite important at the end of the novel, when the two of them conspire over a plate of cold chicken.  At the end of the novel the two come together to deal with the unfortunate events of the day--Daisy running over Myrtle.  This secret society to which only Daisy and Tom belong is protected by the wealth that they enjoy, allowing no one else to enter.  Even though Daisy and Tom might have relationships with others, these others are excluded from the secret society, a society that keeps them "silver, safe and proud above the hot struggles of the poor."  (Ch. 8).

In Chapter 5, after Nick witnesses the reunion of Gatsby and Daisy at his house, Nick comments that the fantasy of Daisy exceeded her reality for Gatsby:

There must have been moments even that afternoon when Daisy tumbled short of his dreams--not through her own fault but because of the colossal vitality of his illusion.

Here Nick understands that Gatsby has made Daisy into something much bigger in his mind that she is reality.  Gatsby's dreams are constantly undermined by the world's reality.  Daisy in the flesh can never equal Gatsby's vision of her.  This observation of others and of life is a keen one.  Gatsby is a romantic.  He sees others as they should be and not how they are.

Lastly, when Nick is riding through Central Park with Jordan and is asked to help set up a clandestine meeting between Daisy and Gatsby, he remembers as statement that applies to the people he knows

"There are only the pursued, the pursuing, the busy, and the tired."

This quote appearing at the end of Chapter 4 is an interesting commentary on the people that Nick knows.  It is interesting to speculate which characters in the novel fall into each of these cagtegories.

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