In the story "The Necklace," how did Mathilde and her husband manage to raise money to buy a necklace?

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Before attending the Minister of Public Instruction's party, Mathilde Loisel borrows Madame Forestier's "diamond" necklace. Unfortunately, Mathilde Loisel loses the necklace and immediately begins making arrangements to raise money to replace the necklace. Mathilde and her husband discover that the exact same necklace is worth thirty-six thousand francs and agree to buy it from the jeweler. Monsieur Loisel spends all of his inheritance money, which is eighteen-thousands francs, and borrows the rest of the money in small, varying amounts from usurers. Maupassant writes,

He [Monsieur Loisel] did borrow, asking a thousand francs of one, five hundred of another, five louis here, three louis there. He gave notes, took up ruinous obligations, dealt with usurers, and all the race of lenders. (11)

Eventually, the Loisels are able to acquire thirty-six thousand francs to buy the authentic diamond necklace. The couple then spends the next ten years working endlessly to pay off their debts. They dismiss their servant, move into a significantly smaller dwelling, and frugally spend their money. Monsieur Loisel also takes up an evening job copying manuscripts for extra money. After ten years, the Loisels finally pay off their debts only to discover that the necklace Mathilde had lost was a worthless imitation.

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Mathilde's husband had 18,000 francs in savings--one-half of what they needed to purchase an identical diamond necklace as the one they had lost--but the couple had to raise the rest of the money themselves. Monsieur Loisel borrowed the remainder, risking his future in order to pay off the debt and avoid the possibility of being imprisoned for theft.

     He did borrow, asking a thousand francs of one, five hundred of another, five louis here, three louis there. He gave notes, took up ruinous obligations, dealt with usurers and all the race of lenders. He compromised all the rest of his life, risked signing a note without even knowing whether he could meet it...

When he had borrowed the remaining 18,000 francs, he sent his wife with the money to repay Madame Forestier, who chastized Mathilde, telling her

"You should have returned it earlier."

The couple then spent the next 10 years working additional jobs--he worked evenings and even late into the night, and she fired her maid and did all of the housework herself--saving every penny they could in order to pay the husband's promisory notes.

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