In the story "Home" by Anton Chekhov, why did the seven-year-old boy's dad say he was no longer his son? And what relationship did it show between the lawyer and his son when it said, "Pa-Pa Has...

In the story "Home" by Anton Chekhov, why did the seven-year-old boy's dad say he was no longer his son? And what relationship did it show between the lawyer and his son when it said, "Pa-Pa Has come!"

The story we got was not the whole story; it ended when the lawyer was saying that he was no longer his son and then one more paragraph that said he shrugged his shoulders and that's it. How can I use just this text to find out the answer?

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In the beginning of the story, Yevgeny Petrovitch Bykovsky (a circuit court prosecutor), has just been told by his seven year old son's governess that the boy has been smoking. What's more, the governess asserts that the tobacco came from the prosecutor's own drawer.

Petrovitch tells the governess to send the boy to him so that he can talk to his son. However, when he tries to imagine his son smoking, the vision of his son 'with a huge cigar, a yard long, in the midst of clouds of tobacco smoke' causes him to smile at the absurd image. Petrovitch then reminisces about his...

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