In the story "Home" by Anton Chekhov, why did the seven-year-old boy's dad say he was no longer his son? And what relationship did it show between the lawyer and his son when it said, "Pa-Pa Has...

In the story "Home" by Anton Chekhov, why did the seven-year-old boy's dad say he was no longer his son? And what relationship did it show between the lawyer and his son when it said, "Pa-Pa Has come!"

The story we got was not the whole story; it ended when the lawyer was saying that he was no longer his son and then one more paragraph that said he shrugged his shoulders and that's it. How can I use just this text to find out the answer?

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teachsuccess | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

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In the beginning of the story, Yevgeny Petrovitch Bykovsky (a circuit court prosecutor), has just been told by his seven year old son's governess that the boy has been smoking. What's more, the governess asserts that the tobacco came from the prosecutor's own drawer.

Petrovitch tells the governess to send the boy to him so that he can talk to his son. However, when he tries to imagine his son smoking, the vision of his son 'with a huge cigar, a yard long, in the midst of clouds of tobacco smoke' causes him to smile at the absurd image. Petrovitch then reminisces about his youth when boys at his high school were either expelled or flogged mercilessly for the crime of smoking. It seemed to him as if the teachers and parents of his time were unduly terrified of an evil they could not fully understand nor explain.

In short, Petrovitch does not believe that smoking is an evil to be avoided at all costs. This is why he has a hard time presenting a stern image to his son in order to impress on Seryozha the dangers of smoking. Seryozha's affectionate "Pa-pa has come!" further shows that the relationship between father and son is a close one. We have further proof of this when Petrovitch laughingly refers to Seryozha as the 'little cherub' when the governess presents her indignant report of the boy smoking.

In a grand attempt to appear uncompromisingly severe, Petrovitch proceeds to inform the boy that he does not love Seryozha anymore, nor does he consider Seryozha his own son on account of such bad behavior. By threatening to withdraw the obvious affection he feels for his son, Petrovitch hopes to inspire his son to give up using his father's tobacco.

Hope this helps! I have used textual evidence from the story the way it was presented to you.

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