In the story in Genesis 30, is there a distinctively "Christian" interpretation, as opposed to a "Jewish" interpretation?

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Genesis 30, the narrative about the birth of Jacob's sons and his daughter Dinah and enmity between the sisters Leah and Rachel, is not considered connected to New Testament prophetic literature, as Genesis 49 is, for example, and therefore cannot be said to have a distinct Christian interpretation as opposed...

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Genesis 30, the narrative about the birth of Jacob's sons and his daughter Dinah and enmity between the sisters Leah and Rachel, is not considered connected to New Testament prophetic literature, as Genesis 49 is, for example, and therefore cannot be said to have a distinct Christian interpretation as opposed to a Jewish interpretation. The only Christian connection that can be drawn is an indirect one whereby the principle is developed that prophecy is attached to history while focusing on the future, as opposed to being devoid of any reference to history.

This is an important principle to establish and consider as it addresses the Christian controversy of whether prophesy fulfilled separates the resulting present-day practice from past practice. In other words, and by way of example, does fulfilled prophesy dissolve the need for Christian congregations to meet on the Sabbath, thus permitting meeting on Sunday.

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