In Steinbeck's Of Mice and Men, will George, Lennie, and Candy achieve their dream of buying their own ranch?

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When Candy overhears George telling Lennie about all of the things they will do with the ranch once they own it, the old swamper asks to get in on the deal. George is skeptical at first, but when Candy offers $350 towards the $600 that they need to buy it,...

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When Candy overhears George telling Lennie about all of the things they will do with the ranch once they own it, the old swamper asks to get in on the deal. George is skeptical at first, but when Candy offers $350 towards the $600 that they need to buy it, the reality of owning the ranch becomes possible in his mind. George figures that at the end of the month he and Lennie will have $100; and with $450, he figures that the old couple that needs to sell might let them have it for the lower price until they can come up with the rest of the money. Candy and Lennie could start working the land, chickens, and sell eggs while George finds one more job to help with finalizing the payments. The plan seems realistic and logical; so, if a student were asked at this point to predict if the friends will achieve their dream or not, he or she might confidently say that they will. Unfortunately, trouble seems to follow Lennie and events beyond George's control prohibit them all from ever buying the ranch together. 

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