What are some quick standard facts about the Second New Deal (maybe the first as well)?

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pohnpei397 | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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The Second New Deal is typically said to have taken place in the second half of President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s first term in office.  That is, the Second New Deal consisted of programs that Roosevelt proposed between 1935 to 1936, whereas the First New Deal began when he took office in 1933 and continued through 1934.  The Second New Deal is said to have been both more Keynesian than the first and more oriented toward reform.

By 1935, it was clear that the problems of the Depression had not been completely solved.  Unemployment was still high and many were criticizing Roosevelt from the left.  In response, Roosevelt acted more aggressively to cut unemployment through Keynesian deficit spending.  The most important of the programs meant to accomplish this was the Works Progress Administration, which employed people to work on a number of public works around the country.

However, Roosevelt did not just want to fix the short term problem of unemployment.  Instead, he wanted to change the US, improving its economy in the long term.  In the Second New Deal, FDR proposed more programs that were aimed at changing the American economy in important ways.  Two of the most prominent of these programs were the Wagner Act, which gave more power to labor unions, and the Rural Electrification Act, which improved America’s economic potential by bringing electricity to rural areas.  It was also during this time that Roosevelt proposed and Congress passed the Social Security Act of 1935, setting up pensions for older Americans.

The Second New Deal, then, is a name used for the second phase of FDR’s New Deal programs.  This second phase focused more on deficit spending to provide jobs for those still unemployed and on long-term reform programs to improve economic potential and stability.

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hpsauce | eNotes Newbie

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The Second New Deal is typically said to have taken place in the second half of President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s first term in office.  That is, the Second New Deal consisted of programs that Roosevelt proposed between 1935 to 1936, whereas the First New Deal began when he took office in 1933 and continued through 1934.  The Second New Deal is said to have been both more Keynesian than the first and more oriented toward reform.

By 1935, it was clear that the problems of the Depression had not been completely solved.  Unemployment was still high and many were criticizing Roosevelt from the left.  In response, Roosevelt acted more aggressively to cut unemployment through Keynesian deficit spending.  The most important of the programs meant to accomplish this was the Works Progress Administration, which employed people to work on a number of public works around the country.

However, Roosevelt did not just want to fix the short term problem of unemployment.  Instead, he wanted to change the US, improving its economy in the long term.  In the Second New Deal, FDR proposed more programs that were aimed at changing the American economy in important ways.  Two of the most prominent of these programs were the Wagner Act, which gave more power to labor unions, and the Rural Electrification Act, which improved America’s economic potential by bringing electricity to rural areas.  It was also during this time that Roosevelt proposed and Congress passed the Social Security Act of 1935, setting up pensions for older Americans.

The Second New Deal, then, is a name used for the second phase of FDR’s New Deal programs.  This second phase focused more on deficit spending to provide jobs for those still unemployed and on long-term reform programs to improve economic potential and stability.

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