Is someone with multiple personalities treated or admitted differently than any other E.R. patient if they are treated for physical injury?For medical records does each personality have its own...

Is someone with multiple personalities treated or admitted differently than any other E.R. patient if they are treated for physical injury?

For medical records does each personality have its own file or are they considered dangerous from an employee's view? 

Expert Answers
dano7744 eNotes educator| Certified Educator

Almost all current day modern emergency departments have specific rooms for specific medical or psychiatric patients. For example, a cardiac patient would be placed in a cardiac room equipped with a heart monitor, a victim of trauma would be placed in the trauma room, a patient in need of resuscitation would be placed in the resuscitation room. Other rooms specifically designed to accommodate a specific type of patient are the pelvic room, fast-track rooms for minor illnesses like mild sore throat, ortho. room for orthopedic injuries, and a psychiatric room for patients suffering from some type of psychiatric or mental illness.

Any psychiatric patient always poses a potential for disruptive, agitated, or combative behavior due to their disease process. People that design ER's recognize this and know that these type of patients should be isolated from the other patient population. A good example of this is say a mother brings in a small child with an earache (very common complaint), the staff would not want to put this patient in a room adjacent to a patient that was delusional or hallucinating from paranoid schizophrenia. You wouldn't want the child to be exposed to harsh language or disruptive behavior. Furthermore, this same child shouldn't be exposed to say a patient in cardiac arrest that needed CPR.

Some ER's have what they call seclusion rooms that are reserved for the most dangerous patients, some forms of mental illness can cause the patient to be belligerent and combative. These rooms are specially constructed to dampen the sound level and may also have special equipment to temporarily confine or restrain the patient.

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