Social Networking and influence on teaching and learningI have been teaching online for sometime now.  The students I teach are mostly disable and confined to home or have a need to further their...

Social Networking and influence on teaching and learning

I have been teaching online for sometime now.  The students I teach are mostly disable and confined to home or have a need to further their education and can't attend traditional classes.  I use many tools to assist in the delivery of lessons and instructions.  One of those tools is an online classroom (based on social networking).  I would appreciate anyones input and experiences and would enjoy sharing the teaching model of my online classroom.  If you would like to join the classroom please message me.

Asked on by djmccormick

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litteacher8 | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

I teach online for two different schools.  One is secondary and the other is university.  In both cases, the curriculum is part of the platform.  In other words, everything the students need is usually in the course, with the exception of some internet links.

I also use a special kind of online classroom called a meeting room.  The software I use is Elluminate.  The meeting room allows me to post presentations and write directly on the virtual "whiteboard" and students can as well.  You can also share videos, share your desktops and thus anything on your computer and interact though microphone and chat.  I have found this to be very useful with disabled kids.

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dastice | Elementary School Teacher | (Level 1) Assistant Educator

Posted on

I have taken several online courses since becoming a teacher, and I am a huge fan of them.  One aspect of the Blackboard courses that I really like is that participation in discussions is generally mandatory.  Students are required to post responses to readings, video segments, etc. and to respond to the postings of their peers.  I like this because I am the type of student who tends to sit silently in the back of the room and avoid interaction whenever possible, which results in me not getting as much as I could out of the course if I were more participatory.

By having high school, middle school, or even elementary school students interact using technology, we can help ensure their participation in class discussions.  As much adult interaction these days occurs online, this is wonderful "real world" preparation for them as well.

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hala718 | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

Social networking has become a tool for education. If done right, it could be like an extended classroom discussion. Now for special needs it could have benefits like allowing them to express their knowledge and feelings without feeling that they are different or could not contribute like a regular setting classroom.

I would love to join your network. It would be a great experience. I may be able to help since I have some knowledge in e-learning and could provide some tips.

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slchanmo1885 | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator

Posted on

I took a few Blackboard courses in college, and I found that, although convenient as far as location goes, I preferred in-person classes better. Some of the advantages of this sort of online course are that students have enough time to think in depth about their answers and reply with well formulated responses. It is also advantageous that students can take part in discussion on their own time, from their own location. Some of the disadvantages were that the quick back and forth discussion and debate that sometimes happens in class weren't able to occur in the online model. Also, there were several times when documents would not upload or download, or when the server was busy, or posts were lost. I was extra careful about copying and pasting my answers before posting online, in case the post didn't go through. 

When I was working with third grade, I did an online wiki with students where they posted questions to a children's book author. This worked out great, because the author could access the wiki on his own time, and it wasn't that much of a commitment to him to help us out. The kids were thrilled that he answered their questions and he was impressed with their technological capability. I felt like that project was a good addition to the curriculum and the children gained a lot from it.

 

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ask996 | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Senior Educator

Posted on

Mrs. Monica makes a wonderful point with regard to students who are afraid to speak up in class. The use of online sites as a means of promoting discourse in the classroom can be a wonderful tool, but it all comes down to how the teacher manages the online classroom. Students could find an autonomy to voice their thoughts online, but the teacher must monitor to make sure the same fears in the classroom don't pop up online.

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lrwilliams | College Teacher | (Level 1) Educator

Posted on

Most college classes now have an on line component even with the face to face classes. The classes my daughter takes as a college junior all require some sort of interaction through an online "Blackboard" class. I think that it is going to eventually trickle down to high schools, my concern is how will this effect rural schools and students who may not have the technology to keep up with it.

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drmonica | (Level 2) Associate Educator

Posted on

I’m not convinced that Twitter and Facebook are useful tools for the classroom. However, I have experience using online discussion boards and email in the teaching of English with high school students. I found that many students who don’t like to speak up in class will write lengthy, thoughtful responses to online discussion prompts. Another benefit of using online discussion boards is that the asynchronous nature of these tools allows students to read a prompt then let it “percolate” in their heads before responding. This type of wait time is not possible in a real-time environment.

The “track changes” function and “comment” capability in Word has really revolutionized writing. For students who are unable to meet in person for a conference on a paper, online exchange of materials allows them to obtain teacher feedback and input during the writing process.

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djmccormick | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Adjunct Educator

Posted on

I think that social networking is a growing reality that teachers have to determine a successful course of action.  This extends to allowing students the chance to text answers into the classroom setting, providing instant feedback to teachers about comprehension.  At the same time, serious discussion is being initiated as to how to integrate Twitter and Facebook into the classroom.  Part of the challenge is the institutional inertia these venues face by administration and school boards.  Yet, as students become increasingly dependent on these technology tools, teachers and administrators have to develop a workable and plausible course of action in determining how to tap this reservoir of student energy.  It sounds like you are on the cutting edge of this.

I have to agree that institutiona inertia is a formidable challenge.  I have also being trying to easily implement the use of iPods and podcasts in the classroom.  Progress is slow but having more and more colleges and universities require freshman to have iPods as part of their initial academic tools helps.  I do have to admit though that their are many challenges to overcome.  I used to allow students to listen to their iPods while working or taking exams.  I have currently suspended that practice after catching a student using his iPod to check.  He had made a voice recording of all of his notes and had it on his iPod.  A step forward, a step backward.

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Ashley Kannan | Middle School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

I think that social networking is a growing reality that teachers have to determine a successful course of action.  This extends to allowing students the chance to text answers into the classroom setting, providing instant feedback to teachers about comprehension.  At the same time, serious discussion is being initiated as to how to integrate Twitter and Facebook into the classroom.  Part of the challenge is the institutional inertia these venues face by administration and school boards.  Yet, as students become increasingly dependent on these technology tools, teachers and administrators have to develop a workable and plausible course of action in determining how to tap this reservoir of student energy.  It sounds like you are on the cutting edge of this.

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adobebrad | eNotes Newbie

Posted on

Hey,

While I agree online courses have begun to greatly benefit the student experience I feel that teachers can also benefit from some of the newest technology. I currently work with Adobe and the Adobe Education Exchange is a great resource for educators. The AEE community has nearly 2,000 members and offers a lot of great teaching tool. I hope I was able to be of some help, heres the link http://edexchange.adobe.com/pages/home !

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ladrigan | Middle School Teacher | eNotes Newbie

Posted on

In my suburban middle school we have started using Moodle in the classroom.  A student can take a quiz online and have their multiple questions graded immediately.  You an also do essay questions and grade them online.  There is a spot for online blogging and group work.  A downfall does happen, when the website is not responding (due to local server problems).  A day's lesson plan online needs to always have a classroom backup.

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