Sir Gawain shows loyalty when he does what?

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The figure to whom Gawain shows perhaps the most loyalty is his God. Although he has a deep sense of loyalty to Arthur, his king, the Green Knight, his foe, as well as to Lord Bertilak, his host, Gawain faithfully relies on his religion and remains true to the tenets...

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The figure to whom Gawain shows perhaps the most loyalty is his God. Although he has a deep sense of loyalty to Arthur, his king, the Green Knight, his foe, as well as to Lord Bertilak, his host, Gawain faithfully relies on his religion and remains true to the tenets of that religion throughout the story.

Before he sets off in search of the Green Knight, he receives his symbolic shield with multiple Christian references that he looks to for comfort and inspiration. Throughout his travels, Gawain constantly shows devotion and loyalty through his prayers and faithfulness in attending Mass when he can. Once he is in Lord Bertilak's castle and faces temptation from the lord's wife, Gawain speaks of how only his loyalty to God could keep him from succumbing. Lastly, when he realizes his dishonesty to Lord Bertilak, he vows to wear the girdle as a form of religious penance.

Therefore, although Gawain demonstrates loyalty to various people throughout the story, the context and rationale for that loyalty goes back to his loyalty to his religious beliefs.

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Sir Gawain is certainly loyal to King Arthur at the beginning of the poem. When none of the rest of Arthur's court is willing to step up and accept the challenge of the mysterious Green Knight, Arthur offers to do it himself, at which point Gawain stands up and asks to be allowed to fight. True to his word—and indicative of his famous and impressive chivalry and integrity—Gawain not only beheads the knight in service of his king but also agrees to meet the knight again in a year.

Later, Gawain also shows the depth of loyalty expected according to the chivalric code between a guest and his host when he agrees to the conditions Bertilak sets for him. Bertilak asks Gawain to render back to his host at the end of every day all the things he has received in that day, which Gawain duly does. He returns to his host even the kisses he has received, despite the fact that this could raise questions with Bertilak. He only falters in his failure to disclose the girdle Bertilak's wife gives him, believing that this could protect him when he faces the Green Knight once more.

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Gawain shows loyalty to his uncle, King Arthur, when he is the only one to step forward to accept the Green Knight's challenge.  The Knight had urged any of the Knights of the Round Table to take his ax and attempt to decapitate him.  None of the Knights of the Round Table (Arthur included) took him seriously, so no one came forward.  When the Green Knight insisted, only young Gawain, not even yet a knight, came forward to save face for the knights of Camelot.  Before taking the Green Knight's ax, Arthur knights Gawain in a brief ceremony.  Once Gawain cuts off the Green Knight's head, the Green Knight's body picks up his own head and declares that he will see Gawain in one year so that the young man can receive the return blow that is coming to him.  Gawain is determined to follow through with his part of the bargain in order to show his loyalty to Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table.  He sets out, and eventually does face the Green Knight on New Year's the following year.

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