As (Since) I have gained weight, I have become (been) less confident. Am I right if I understand the followings? 1) Is there any difference in meaning between “become (gotten)” and “been”?...

As (Since) I have gained weight, I have become (been) less confident.

Am I right if I understand the followings?

1) Is there any difference in meaning between “become (gotten)” and “been”?

I have become (gotten) less confident = I started to be less confident in the past and continue to be less and less confident into the present.

I have been less confident = I started to be less confident in the past but it stopped and continue to be same state of confidence until now.

2) Since

Since I have gained weight = I started to gain weight in the past and have been gaining weight continuously until now.

Since I gained weight = I gained weight in the past but no more information about the weight until now. (Is it possible that I lose weight?)

3) the translation of “as” (“while” or “at the same time”)

And in terms of the translation of “as” in here, it seems to me alright that “as” means “while” because it is within “the present perfect” where the action continues into the present.

However, if “as” means “at the same time”, I feel unclear and think you better say “As I gained weight, I have become less confident.”

If I am wrong, what is the meaning (or the nuance) difference between “while” and “at the same time”?

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Lorraine Caplan eNotes educator | Certified Educator

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Let's try to look at just a few of these this evening.

First, there is a difference in nuance between "become" and "been." The act of becoming is different from the act of being.  Let me give you some examples: 

I have become tolerant. 

I have been tolerant. 

Do you see the difference in the two?  In the first example, the person was not tolerant and then turned into a tolerant person, a change that extends into the present.  In the second example, the person was in a state of tolerance that does not necessarily suggest this was a change for the person.  There is also a nuance in the second example that suggests the person might not continue to be tolerant into the future, in spite of this being the present perfect.  Picture a parent who is not pleased with his child's behavior saying, "I have been tolerant with you."  There is a suggestion in that statement that the parent's tolerance is coming to an end. 

Now, let us look at this...

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