Can you help me understand simple subjects and simple predicates for my school assignment?Underline the simple subject once and the simple predicate twice in the following sentences. 1. When will...

Can you help me understand simple subjects and simple predicates for my school assignment?

Underline the simple subject once and the simple predicate twice in the following sentences.

1. When will we get to Malika's house?

2. Into the yard strode the Colonel, an angry scowl clouding his features.

3. There was never any doubt about the outcome of the game.

4. Here comes the principal, looking grim.

5. It all started on the first day of spring.

6. What have you done with your shoes?

7. Higher and higher rose the balloon, clearing the trees and finally disappearing from sight.

8. Sweetly sang the nightingale.

9. "Compelling and spirited," raved the movie critic.

10. Never have I seen such a shocking display!

11. Inside the cave ran a network of passageways, leading deeper into the side of the mountain.

12. Down from the Rockies flows the Columbia River, travelling thousands of kilometres on its way to the Pacific Ocean.

Expert Answers
missy575 eNotes educator| Certified Educator

We do not do homework for students here at enotes, therefore I have edited your question so you can get the information you need to have your question answered.

You are asking about identifying simple subjects and predicates.

There is a distinct actor in every sentence. This is your simple subject. Who or whatever is doing the main action of the sentence is this person. Usually this person or item comes first, but your sample sentences demonstrate that this is not always the case.

For example:

Into the yard strode the Colonel, an angry scowl clouding his features.

In this sentence, "the Colonel" is doing the main action of "strode". The simple subject comes after the main verb!

Now, your simple predicate is that main verb. So, you are always looking for the verb that happens to be the actual act that the subject is doing. Be careful because many sentences have many verbs to trip you up, but some are just describing (which really makes them an adjective)

A hint for finding simple predicates in the sentences you provided: most of the time they are in the past tense.

Good luck.